Daher presents its new range of TBM aircraft: the TBM 900 is joined by the TBM 930

Daher unveiled the expanded range of its TBM very fast turboprop aircraft family, which now consists of the TBM 900 and the TBM 930 version – each of which retain the performance and technical features that have made the TBM 900 a business aviation success, with more than 110 sold since its launch two years ago.


Daher has introduced the e-copilot® function on Model Year 2016 aircraft for both the TBM 900 and TBM 930, incorporating the following systems and functionality for reduced pilot workload:
• A sensor and angle of attack calculator (AOA), providing angle of attack information on the primary flight display;
• Electronic stabilization and protection systems (ESP) and Under Speed Protection (USP), which are connected to the AOA computer. These electronic monitoring and stability augmentation systems assist the pilot in maintaining the aircraft in a stable flight condition when flight parameters are exceeded;
• An emergency descent mode (EDM) in the autopilot, which places the aircraft in automatic descent to a safe altitude of 15,000-ft. in the event of cabin depressurization and lack of pilot response; and
• New voice alerts – providing notification on stall, overspeed, landing gear status and oxygen mask use – which replace aural sounds for better warning identification.
With the TBM product line expansion, distinguishing differences between the TBM 900 and TBM 930 are concentrated on their primary avionics.


Daher’s Model Year 2016 TBM 900 retains the liquid crystal displays with Garmin’s G1000 avionics system – incorporating a pair of 10-inch screens and a multifunction display sized at 15 inches, along with a physical keyboard for navigation and communication functions. New this year is the TBM 900’s Bluetooth FS 210 connection system, which enables the use of a tablet or smart phone to prepare maps and flight plans.


Introducing the TBM 930 as the latest step in Daher’s very fast turboprop aircraft family evolution, this version integrates Garmin’s G3000 avionics suite – the first touchscreen-controlled glass flight deck ever designed for light turbine aircraft. Its
cockpit instrument’s panel three wide-format WXGA displays can operate in a splitscreen mode, enabling maps and flight plans to remain on the screen side-by-side with primary, traffic and weather information.


A new glass touchscreen controller serves as the pilot’s primary point of entry for the G3000 system, displaying communication and navigation controls. In addition, the G3000 avionics suite’s high resolution displays enhance the presentation of simulated 3-D perspective topography for Garmin’s SVT™ Synthetic Vision Technology.
In terms of aesthetics, Daher has developed a new interior for the TBM 930 with redesigned seating and headrests, along with a new choice of wood or carbon finishes. For an additional touch of style, polished metal is used for handles, door sills and steps.


Didier Kayat, CEO of the Daher group parent company, said more than 50 new TBM aircraft in the TBM 900 and TBM 930 versions are expected to be delivered in 2016.

Piper Aircraft Launches Meridian M500!

Piper Aircraft Launches M500 Product with the Latest in Garmin Avionics

"The 2015 Piper M500 will come equipped with the very newest Garmin avionics package for increased safety," said Piper President and CEO Simon Caldecott. "As part of our on-going product improvement initiatives, we saw an opportunity to give our customers the latest improvements in proven avionics technology with electronic stability protection, under speed protection and automatic level mode among other improvements."
 
The Piper M500 seats six with club seating. It is powered by a Pratt & Whitney PT6A-42A 500shp engine, sports a 260 KTAS / 482 km/h max cruise speed and has a range of 1,000 nm / 1,852 km. Equipped with an improved Garmin G1000 avionics suite, the 2015 M500 is listed at a competitive price of $2.26 million.
 
Upgraded Avionics
The M500's new Garmin G1000 avionics suite will feature high resolution dual 10-inch PFDs, and a high resolution 12-inch MFD as well as the latest Garmin Software upgrade along with a GFC700 autopilot with enhanced Autopilot Flight Control System (AFCS) including a number of flight safety features:
Electronic Stability Protection (ESP)
Under Speed Protection (USP)
Coupled Go-Around
Expanded Engagement Envelope
Level Mode
Auto Pilot Auto-Engage
Master caution, master warning, gear position, gear warning incorporated in the G1000
Electronic Stability Protection
Electronic Stability Protection (ESP) helps prevent the onset of stall/spins, steep spirals, and loss-of-control conditions.  This passive feature discourages aircraft operation outside the desired flight envelope. ESP functions independently of the auto pilot system and only takes effect when the pilot is hand-flying the aircraft with the auto pilot disengaged.  It works as a soft "barrier" to keep the Piper M500 inside the performance envelope by automatically engaging servos to slightly correct control surface positions when the aircraft exceeds one or more flight parameter - essentially "nudging" it back inside safe parameters.
 
Underspeed Protection
Underspeed Protection (USP) is a flight director function that reacts to under speed conditions in a way that allows the autopilot to remain engaged but prevents the airplane from stalling while the PFD annunciates when active.
 
With stall protections developed as part of the USP system, coupled go-arounds are possible without disengaging the autopilot. With this feature, the autopilot will remain engaged and fly the missed approach. If power is not added, the USP system will maintain a speed just above stall warning, adjusting airplane pitch attitude as required.
 
Automatic Level Mode (Blue Button)
The M500 also features as standard equipment an autopilot Level Mode function that, when triggered, will return the aircraft to a wings level attitude with zero vertical speed. Upon activation, Level Mode will automatically engage the flight director and autopilot functions to return the aircraft to straight and level flight. Activating Level Mode cancels all armed and active modes, leaving all other autopilot modes available while the Level Mode is activated, simply by pressing the associated mode control button.
 
Additional Improvements
Other major improvements for the Meridian M500 includes a new digital pressurization which fully integrates with G1000, the Aspen EFD-1000 standby instrument, electroluminescent placards in cockpit, GTX 33 Extended Squitter Transponder, a centrally located single audio panel, dual USB charging ports, and an optional GTS 825 Traffic Advisory System, which coupled with the GTX 33ES gives the aircraft ADS-B In and Out functionality. M500 aircraft are also offered with the optional Garmin GSR-56 Global Satellite Datalink Iridium Satellite Transceiver.

Aviation Insurance for aircraft owners explained!

Public liability insurance

This coverage, often referred to as third party liability covers aircraft owners for damage that their aircraft does to third party property, such as houses, cars, crops, airport facilities and other aircraft struck in a collision. It does not provide coverage for damage to the insured aircraft itself or coverage for passengers injured on the insured aircraft. After an accident an insurance company will compensate victims for their losses, but if a settlement can not be reached then the case is usually taken to court to decide liability and the amount of damages. Public liability insurance is mandatory in most countries and is usually purchased in specified total amounts per incident, such as $1,000,000 or $5,000,000.

Passenger liability insurance

Passenger liability protects passengers riding in the accident aircraft who are injured or killed. In many countries this coverage is mandatory only for commercial or large aircraft. Coverage is often sold on a "per-seat" basis, with a specified limit for each passenger seat.

Combined Single Limit (CSL)

CSL coverage combines public liability and passenger liability coverage into a single coverage with a single overall limit per accident. This type of coverage provides more flexibility in paying claims for liability, especially if passengers are injured, but little damage is done to third party property on the ground.

Ground risk hull insurance not in motion

This provides coverage for the insured aircraft against damage when it is on the ground and not in motion. This would provide protection for the aircraft for such events as fire, theft, vandalism, flood, mudslides, animal damage, wind or hailstorms, hangar collapse or for uninsured vehicles or aircraft striking the aircraft. The amount of coverage may be a book value or an agreed value that was set when the policy was purchased.

The use of the insurance term "hull" to refer to the insured aircraft betrays the origins of aviation insurance in marine insurance. Most hull insurance includes a deductible to discourage small or nuisance claims.

Ground risk hull insurance in motion (taxiing)

This coverage is similar to ground risk hull insurance not in motion, but provides coverage while the aircraft is taxiing, but not while taking off or landing. Normally coverage ceases at the start of the take-off roll and is in force only once the aircraft has completed its subsequent landing. Due to disputes between aircraft owners and insurance companies about whether the accident aircraft was in fact taxiing or attempting to take-off this coverage has been discontinued by many insurance companies.

In-flight insurance

In-flight coverage protects an insured aircraft against damage during all phases of flight and ground operation, including while parked or stored. Naturally it is more expensive than not-in-motion coverage since most aircraft are damaged while in motion.[5]